World Harbors FAQ

World Harbors Marinades & Sauces

1. Q: Where can I find World Harbors Marinades & Sauces?
A: Please visit the Store Locator page to find out the stores near you that carry our products. They are normally found in the marinade section or in the specialty sauce section of the grocery store.

2. Q: Do I need to refrigerate the products after opening?
A: Yes, for optimal flavor and shelf life, refrigerate after opening.

3. Q: Are World Harbors Marinades & Sauces gluten free?
A: Yes, the following flavors of World Harbors ARE gluten free: Fajita, Thai, Lemon Pepper, Honey Dijon, Mojo, Italian Grill, Island Mango and Steakhouse.
The following flavors are NOT gluten free: Teriyaki, Sweet & Sour, Jerk, Bar-B, and Hot Teriyaki.

4. Q: How long can I keep World Harbors Marinades & Sauces after I've opened it?
A: We recommend checking the ‘Best when used by’ date printed on the side of the label.

5. Q: Can I shop online?
A: Yes, you may purchase World Harbors Marinades & Sauces online by visiting our Online Store

World Harbors BBQ Sauce

1. Q: Where can I find World Harbors BBQ Sauces?
A: Please visit the Store Locator page to find out the stores near you that carry our products. They are normally found in the condiment section or in the specialty sauce section of the grocery store

2. Q: Do I need to refrigerate the products after opening?

A: Yes, for optimal flavor and shelf life, refrigerate after opening.

3. Q: Are World Harbors BBQ Sauces gluten free?

A: Yes all flavors of Buccaneer Blends BBQ Sauces ARE gluten free. 



4. Q: How long can I keep World Harbors BBQ Sauces after I've opened it?

A: We recommend checking the ‘Best when used by’ date printed on the side of the label.

5. Q: Can I shop online?

A: Yes, you may purchase World Harbors BBQ Sauces online by visiting our Online Store.

Why Marinade

Marinating is a great way to intensify the flavor of food with just a few basic ingredients. So, choose your favorite flavors and soak up... More

  • Marinating is a great way to intensify the flavor of food with just a few basic ingredients. So, choose your favorite flavors and soak up some easy-to-follow tips!
  • The purpose of marinating is to add flavor and, in some cases, tenderize meat, chicken and fish. Marinades can even be used on some vegetables, including eggplant, zucchini and artichoke. Part of the trick is to plan ahead so your food has time to absorb the flavors.
  • Remember - A well-prepared marinade can help an amateur on the grill prepare food that tastes like it was prepared by an experienced grill master!
  • Marinating meat, is a great way to keep your grocery bills down. You can get the cheaper cuts of meat, and still get the same great taste. You just have to plan a bit more, but it is well worth the savings.
  • If you have meat that is tough, and you are not planning on barbequing or grilling it, then get out the slow cooker. It is amazing how tender meat can get from slow cooking all day.
  • Marinating meat, fish, and poultry significantly decreases the amount of carcinogenic heterocyclic amines (HCAs) produced when the meat is cooked at high temperatures, like in grilling. Marinades can reduce HCAs by as much as 99 percent.
  • Adding fresh rosemary to any marinade ups the anti-cancer potential of your marinade.
  • Marinades may slow the growth of harmful bacteria, like listeria.

Selecting & Preparing a Marinade

Decide whether you want to just add flavor, tenderize the meat, or both. The following tips will help... More

Decide whether you want to just add flavor, tenderize the meat, or both. The following tips will help:

  • Flavoring marinades do exactly what they should—add flavor. Marinating times for chicken can range from just 15 minutes to several hours.
  • Tenderizing marinades include an acidic ingredient such as wine, vinegar, yogurt, tomatoes, lemon juice, and lime juice, combined with herbs, seasonings and oil. Some fruits also contain tenderizing enzymes. These include pineapple, papaya, kiwi and figs.

Marinades vary from recipe to recipe but they generally contain three basic components - oils, acids and seasonings.

Oils: The oil content in a marinade locks in the natural flavor and prevents the food from drying out. Some oils can also add flavor. Good oils for marinating include olive, sesame, peanut and infused oils (such as chili).

Acids: These ingredients tenderize meat by denaturing or “unraveling” its proteins - this softens the surface and allows flavors to be absorbed.

  • Acids include vinegar, wine, sherry, citrus juice, yogurt and buttermilk.
  • Yogurt and buttermilk tend to keep foods moist, while a citrus-based marinade can "cook" raw fish.

Seasonings: These provide the unique flavors. Garlic, ginger and onion are generally included. Also used are herbs and chili to spice things up, or honey and sugar to sweeten the food.

  • Seasonings include citrus peel, soy sauce, mustard, salt and pepper, and herbs and spices.
  • Salt is not just for flavoring. Salt has a brining effect which increases the juiciness of the meat.
  • Soy sauce is a common marinade ingredient and many of the great marinades include soy as a substitute for salt.
  • Pepper burns and is not a good component of a marinade.
  • Sugar or honey are often included in marinades as a sweetener and to add increased browning or to blacken the meat during the grilling process.
  • A marinade should be thin enough in consistency to penetrate the meat; otherwise, the flavor desired will not be reached. Keep in mind that there is a difference between sauces and marinades.
  • Not all marinades need to contain liquid ingredients - some consist of only dry ingredients, such as herbs and spices. These mixtures are often referred to as "rubs" (because they are literally rubbed onto the surface of your food). Once the rub is applied to your meat, chicken or fish, cover the dish with plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator to marinate.

Notice whether the marinade contains these three key ingredients: acid (such as wine, lemon juice or vinegar), salt or alcohol. Each one reduces the amount of time the meat should marinate.

Preparing to Grill

Clean grates speak for themselves! Preheat for a good long while (5 to 10 minutes) and then clean the grill by using a wire brush... More

  • Clean grates speak for themselves! Preheat for a good long while (5 to 10 minutes) and then clean the grill by using a wire brush to remove any char from prior grilling. Once brushed, pour a small amount of vegetable oil over a clean towel and wipe the grill to remove any remaining charred particles. Hold the towel with a set of tongs to avoid burns.
  • If your grill is already clean, you still need to preheat your grill—it should be very hot when you add the meat.
  • For direct cooking on a charcoal grill, make sure there is enough charcoal to extend in a single layer 1 to 2 inches beyond the area of the food on the grill. Pour briquettes into the grill to determine the quantity, then stack into a pyramid for lighting.
  • Generally, use 30 briquets (just over 1lb.) to grill 1lb. of meat or poultry. REMEMBER - the size and type of your grill, type of food and the weather all affect the amount of charcoal you need.
  • Bad weather? Use a few more briquets than normal to make sure the fire stays hot.
  • When using charcoal, douse the coals with the least amount of starter fluid as possible to light the fire. If starter fluid is unavailable, try using regular salad oil. Wad a sheet of newspaper and pile the coals over it, then douse the coals with the salad oil. Light the paper as you would using normal starter fluid.
  • If a grilling recipe refers to the amount of charcoal needed in a volumetric measure (i.e. a gallon, a quart), a general rule of thumb is that there are 16 briquets to a quart or 64 to a gallon.

Storing coals

  • Store briquets in a cool, dry area of the basement or garage. When charcoal absorbs moisture, it can be hard to light.
  • For instant-lighting charcoal, keep bag tightly closed to prevent lighter fluid from evaporating.

Meat Selection & Prep

A secret to tender, moist, tasty meat and fish is the cut you choose. The best cut for grilling steaks is a full one-inch thick... More

  • A secret to tender, moist, tasty meat and fish is the cut you choose. The best cut for grilling steaks is a full one-inch thick.
  • For “juicy” hamburgers, go with ground beef that is about 15 to 20 percent fat.
  • Trim beef steaks to 1/8 inch fat—this reduces grease drippings to help minimize open flames.
  • Fish fillets should be cut from 1 to 1-1/2 inches thick—anything thinner will dry out too quickly.
  • Pork chops should also be at least 1 to 1-1/2 inches thick—this cut is ready when the meat is no longer pink along the bone and when the juices run clear.
  • Lamb shoulder chops are usually a good bargain and offer great flavor but require marinating with an acid based marinade to make them tender. Choose chops that are 1/2” to 3/4” thick to allow for good penetration and even cooking.

What You'll Need

For expert marinating and grilling, have the following utensils on hand: Chef's knives, Tongs for turning the meat during... More

For expert marinating and grilling, have the following utensils on hand:

  • Chef's knives
  • Tongs for turning the meat during preparation and a second pair for turning the meat during cooking – this prevents cross-contamination.
  • Cutting boards
  • A juicer for squeezing fruit.
  • Bamboo skewers for threading pieces of food together (soak skewers in water before using them so they do not burn during grilling).
  • A pastry brush to brush the marinade over the food during grilling.
  • Shallow dishes for marinating the food. These ensure an even coverage of your ingredients. If the food isn't completely covered in marinade, turn it every 30 minutes. Use glass or ceramic dishes if your marinade contains citrus juice, vinegar or garlic. The acid in these ingredients may react with a metal container and taint the food.
  • Grilling grid—for smaller food like chopped vegetables.
  • Disposable aluminum tray—for heating side dishes like baked beans.
  • Wire grill brush—for cleaning grill grates.
  • Insulated, flame-retardant mitts—for handling hot coals and grill.
  • Long-handled tongs—for handling briquets, if used.
  • A spray bottle with water—for over zealous flames while grilling, you can spritz flare-ups, which can blacken your food.

Times & Techniques

Cook foods that take less than 30 minutes directly over the coals. Examples: Boneless chicken, steaks, fish fillets... More

  • Cook foods that take less than 30 minutes directly over the coals. Examples: Boneless chicken, steaks, fish fillets, hamburgers and hot dogs.
  • For indirect cooking, foods that take longer than 30 minutes and are higher in fat are best cooked over indirect heat, in a way similar to oven roasting. Examples: Whole turkeys, bone-in chicken, ribs and briskets.
  • Here’s how:
    • Bank charcoal briquets on one or both sides of a drip pan on the lower grid.
    • Place food on the grill, centered over a drip pan.
    • Close the grill lid to contain heat and seal in smoky flavor.
    • Add water, apple juice or other flavored liquids to the drip pan to provide extra moistness and flavor to food, if desired.
    • Use approximately 25 briquets on each side of the drip pan for the first hour of cooking time. After each additional hour, add 8 new briquets to the outside edges on either side. Move them to the center when they're ashed over.
  • When roasting or grilling with a BBQ pit closed, open a can of beer and place the beer over the hottest part of the fire. The beer will boil and super-saturate the air inside the pit with water vapor, beer flavors and alcohol. This will help in keeping the roasting meats moist, while adding flavor to the meat.
  • Whenever barbecuing, use tongs to turn the meat. A fork should never be used as it will punch holes in the meat and allow the natural juices to escape, causing the meat to lose flavor and become chewy.
  • When grilling meats, it is usually best to turn the meat only once. When grilling meat to a medium or greater doneness, use the lid to assist in cooking. This will decrease the cooking time by applying heat to all sides of the meat at once.
  • Tomato and/or sugar based BBQ sauces should be added only at the end of the grilling process, since these products will burn easily and are seldom considered an internal meat flavoring.
  • When applying a sauce towards the end of the grilling process, warm the sauce in the microwave before applying. This keeps everything at the same temperature and thins the sauce slightly so it will penetrate the meat better.
  • Proteins will tell you when they are ready to flip. If they are still hanging onto the grill, they are not ready to go. Once a good sear is established, they will release on their own. If you try to flip or move and it is trying to hang on, leave it alone for another 30 seconds and then try again. The exception to the rule is when you can tell that it is burning, either from a glaze or if the protein has somehow wrapped itself on the grate.
  • You may want to consider using a timer. Not really chef-like but key to even cooking. For steaks and pork, approx. 12 minutes total on high. 4 minutes at a 45 degree angle, move 90 degrees (45 opposite for diamond hatch) and cook another 4 minutes. Flip and cook for the final 4 minutes and see how it looks. Same with burgers – about 10 minutes for a hefty size.
  • In the summer grill with the lid open, in winter keep it closed.
  • Use a meat thermometer to determine if meat is done. The USDA recommends the following minimum internal temperatures: steak, roasts and fish, 145°F; pork, ground beef and egg dishes, 160°F; chicken breasts and whole poultry, 165°F.
  • To prevent charring, remove visible fat that can cause a flare-up. Cook food in the center of the grill and if using coals, move coals to the side to prevent fat and juices from dripping on them. Cut charred portions off the meat.
  • If using wooden skewers, soak in water for 30 minutes prior to use to keep ends from burning while grilling. To add more internal flavor, soak your skewers in a juice, herb tea or other liquid flavoring instead of water.

Grill Safety

Place your grill on a flat, level surface so it won’t tip over. Keep it away from overhangs, fences, deck railings and shrubbery... More

Pick a safe grilling area

  • Place your grill on a flat, level surface so it won’t tip over. Keep it away from overhangs, fences, deck railings and shrubbery that could be ignited by a sudden flare-up or flying spark.
  • Position the grill in a well-ventilated location. Never barbecue inside homes, tents or vehicles. Burning charcoal inside can kill you. It gives off carbon monoxide, which has no odor.
  • Keep children and pets away from the grill when it's in use.

Handle charcoal carefully

  • Never add lighter fluid directly to hot coals to get a sluggish fire going again. The flame could travel up the stream of fluid and burn you.
  • If coals are slow to start, place several new briquets in a small metal can and apply lighter fluid following lighter fluid instructions. Add these briquets, using a pair of long-handled tongs, to warm coals and light with a match.
  • Never use gasoline or kerosene to light a charcoal fire. Use of either can cause an explosion.
  • Do not close the lid until you are ready to cook. Doing so might put out the fire or cause a rush of flames when the lid is removed. Closing the lid prematurely also can prevent charcoal lighter fluid from completely burning away, giving foods a strange taste.
  • Coals are HOT — they can reach up to 1000°F. Use insulated, flame-retardant mitts when cooking or handling any part of the grill. Also, use long-handled barbecue tongs and utensils for safe handling of food and coals.
  • Smoke the Competition. When smoking meat, pay special attention to controlling internal grill temperature. For an accurate reading, place a candy thermometer's probe through the top grill vent and maintain a temperature of about 225°F to 250°F. If the temperature rises above this range, slide the vent directly under the charcoal nearly closed while wearing heat-protective gloves. Continue to monitor the heat and open the vent again as the temperature drops.

Putting out the fire

  • Place the cover on the grill, close the vents and allow the coals to burn out completely. Let the ashes cool for at least 48 hours and then dispose of them in a non-combustible container.
  • If you must dispose of coals before they’ve completely cooled, remove them individually with long-handled tongs and carefully bury them in a can of sand or in a bucket of water. Never pour the hot coals into a pail of water, or vice versa. Steam from the briquets may burn you.

Using a Marinade

As a general rule, the longer food is left to marinate, the more flavorsome it will become. However, the ideal marinating time... More

  • As a general rule, the longer food is left to marinate, the more flavorsome it will become. However, the ideal marinating time usually depends on what you're marinating, the size of the ingredients and the type of marinade you are using.
  • Small or tender cuts, such as lamb and beef fillets, chicken breasts and seafood, require shorter marinating times (usually two to four hours). Larger or tougher cuts such as leg, rump or shoulder will need longer (usually four to six hours).
  • A high quality cut of meat does not need to be marinated for tenderness, but can benefit from increased flavor.
  • When marinating, allow the sauce to sink as deeply as possible into the meat. A general rule of marinade-to-meat ratio is one-half cup of marinade per pound of meat. Times vary depending on the type, cut and size of the meat.
  • To increase the surface area exposed to the marinade and assist with penetration, make small cuts in the surface of the meat (1/8” every 3/4 of an inch) or poke surface with a fork prior to marinating.
  • Be careful when using acidic marinades. Foods left too long in these blends can change color and texture and denature the protein. Fish fillets, for example, can change in a matter of minutes.
  • Never marinate in aluminum, cast iron or copper. These metals will react with the acids and salts resulting in an off flavor.
  • Remove the skin from poultry prior to marinating. The skin is predominately fat and thus is impenetrable by a marinade plus after soaking in the liquid it will only get soggy and will not crisp properly.

Guide to marinating times

Ingredient Example Time
Meats: Lamb, beef, pork Steaks, chops, cubed 2-4 hours
  Whole roast 4-6 hours (or overnight)
Poultry Fillets, cutlets, wings, drumsticks 2-4 hours
  Whole 4-6 hours (or overnight)
Seafood Prawns, octopus, squid 1-2 hours
Fish Whole fish, steaks, fillets 2-4 hours
  • Remove the fat and skin from the meat so that it's ready for cooking. You shouldn't have to cut or trim the meat after it's been marinated.
  • Combine the meat and marinade in a nonreactive, sealed container. Make especially sure not to use aluminum or cast iron, and try to avoid metal altogether, if possible.
  • Marinate in a sealable plastic bag if you can. You can turn these over often, ensuring that all surfaces get coated in the marinade.
  • Never marinate meat at room temperature. Marinate meat, chicken, and fish in the fridge to prevent the growth of harmful bacteria.
  • To marinate meat before freezing, combine marinade and meat in a bowl. Transfer to a sealable plastic bag. Label, date and freeze. To thaw, place in the fridge overnight or until thawed; the marinade goes to work as soon as thawing has begun. Do not freeze dairy-based marinades – they do not hold up to freezing.
  • When ready to cook, be sure to treat the marinated meat with the same care you would treat any raw meat.
  • Using a half-cup of marinade to every pound of meat helps keep the calorie count down!
  • Discard the marinade after use. Marinades used for raw meat or poultry can be used to baste ingredients as they cook, or for a sauce, but they need be boiled first. Place the marinade in a saucepan over high heat and boil for 5 minutes. This will kill any harmful bacteria.

Food Safety

Any marinade that contains acid, alcohol or salt should not be used for very long, because it will chemically "cook" or denature the food in it... More

  • Any marinade that contains acid, alcohol or salt should not be used for very long, because it will chemically "cook" or denature the food in it. Marinate food in these marinades for less than 4 hours. Marinades that contain citrus juices, especially lemon or lime juice, should be used for only two hours or less. Marinades that contain no salt, acid or alcohol can be marinated overnight or, in some cases, longer.
  • Although marinades thwart bacterial growth and help extend food's life, remember that the food in them is still raw and must be treated as such.
  • Do not reuse a marinade.
  • Pour marinade out of the bottle into a small cup to brush onto your meat if you're going to apply while cooking. Never allow marinade that has come in contact with raw meat to be applied during cooking - it not only increases unhealthy bacteria, but also tends to destroy the flavor of a good cut of meat.
  • For safety, marinate meat in the refrigerator, not on the kitchen counter. Some older recipes call for marinating at room temperature. Do not follow this practice. Marinating at room temperature causes meat to enter the danger zone, between 40°F and 140°F, where bacteria multiply rapidly.
  • When a recipe calls for marinating at room temperature, increase the marinating time, and leave in the refrigerator to achieve similar tenderness and taste results.
  • Always place marinating meat on the bottom shelf of the refrigerator to prevent any possible leaks onto foods below.
  • Never serve cooked meat on the same plate that held raw meat. Bacteria in the raw juices can transfer to the cooked food and cause food poisoning.
  • Cooked meat should never be returned to a cold marinade.